A lot of rain for the eastern 3rd of U.S. but no tropical troubles per se

A lot of rain heading for the East as deep moisture rides out of the warm Gulf of Mexico

A lot of rain heading for the East as deep moisture rides out of the warm Gulf of Mexico

The tropics are busy with hurricane Nadine and now two areas of interest, 92L and 93L, to keep an eye on over the coming days.

However, conditions are just not ripe for anything significant to develop across much of the western and central Atlantic or the Gulf of Mexico. A combination of dry mid-level air and fairly high wind shear should limit any development of either of these two invest areas.

Meanwhile, hurricane Nadine is stuck in the pattern it seems and will be bothering the Azores Islands this week with possible hurricane conditions. After that, Nadine is going nowhere fast as the steering flow is such that we could be talking about it a week from now; still out over the eastern Atlantic.

One side effect of 93L in the western Gulf is its moisture that will feed in to an approaching cold front sweeping across Texas right now. Plenty of deep moisture will be lifted north and east over the week ahead and with it, the chance for heavy rains across portions of the eastern U.S., especially in the mountains. Just be aware of this as too much rain in short order can cause quick flooding problems.

We’ll watch 92L as it moves in to and across the Caribbean Sea. This is the time of year to look for development in that region but as of now, none of the dynamic global models indicate much at all.

I have covered all of this and more in our daily video blog for the HurricaneTrack app for iPhone. If you own it, check it out now. If not, get the app today via the link above or by searching “hurricanetrack” in the app store from your device. I’ll have much more here tomorrow morning.

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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