Sandy nearly a hurricane and poised to become historic event one way or another

Sandy's wind field will ikely expand and could bring tropical storm conditions to a large part of the Southeast U.S.

Sandy's wind field will ikely expand and could bring tropical storm conditions to a large part of the Southeast U.S.

It is going to be a rough day in Jamaica as Sandy is nearing hurricane intensity this morning. Luckily, there is no eye readily apparent in satellite imagery which would indicate significant strengthening but I think it is only a matter of time before Sandy becomes the 10th hurricane of the season.

Jamaica will feel the effects today and tonight followed by a landfall in Cuba early tomorrow morning. The interaction with the higher terrain of eastern Cuba will disrupt the inner core of Sandy and should keep it from being too strong once in the Bahamas. However, sea surface temps are plenty warm there and it would not be surprising to see Sandy regain hurricane intensity while passing through the Bahamas.

Late tomorrow and in to Friday, Florida’s east coast will begin to feel the effects of Sandy wit an increase in wind and surf. Right now, the upper Keys and a good portion of SE Florida is under a tropical storm watch. Since the wind field of Sandy is forecast by the global models to expand significantly, I feel that it is almost a certainty that winds to at least tropical storm force, perhaps up to 50 mph, will be felt across portions of southeast Florida.

The other issue will be the huge wave set up that is going to happen as a result of Sandy’s massive wind field. Beach erosion is likely to be a major concern for east facing beaches along the Florida coast and working up the Southeast coast in to North Carolina. I cannot emphasize this enough and with the growing Moon phase towards full, we could be looking at a major coastal flood event for some areas of the Southeast U.S. coastline. A lot will depend on how far west Sandy tracks as some of the models are indicating a brief jog back to the northwest in a few days. Interests along the Florida east coast all the way up to the North Carolina Outer Banks should be paying close attention to this situation. The chance for substantial ocean overwash, especially in the Outer Banks, seems to be increasing with time.

Then we have the issue of the ECWMF’s idea of an unprecedented impact to the Northeast with Sandy or what ever it becomes once past about 35 N latitude. The model has not given up on its forecast of a general northward track, just passing the Outer Banks and then slamming the Northeast with what looks like hurricane conditions over a large area of coastline. While the GFS remains strong in its forecast of an out-to-sea track, it has been getting a little more west and north with each run. Even if the Euro forecast turns out to be dead wrong, Sandy will leave its mark down south along the Florida east coast and probably the North Carolina Outer Banks. If the Euro is right, then we will remember the ending of the 2012 hurricane season for many years to come.

I’ll have another update posted here by early this evening.

Keep in mind that we do have our iPhone app which is a great way to keep up to date with the latest on Sandy and other tropical news and info. I post video blogs to the app each day with several of them posted daily as needed during such events as this with Sandy. During field missions, our app is the ONLY one that offers live weather data from our own instrumented wind tower. Plus, we set up live web cams and post video updates from the field on a regular basis. You simply cannot find this level of dedication and information WHERE THE ACTION IS from any other hurricane tracking app. To get HurricaneTrack for iPhone, iPod Touch and even the iPad, click here.

Share

About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
Tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply