Copious amount of moisture for parts of Southeast but no development seen with 92L

Radar image showing the large amount of rain across portions of the Southeast

Radar image showing the large amount of rain across portions of the Southeast

There is an awful lot of rain spreading across portions of the Southeast this morning but it’s not associated with the disturbance in the Gulf of Mexico – at least not directly.

Looking at satellite imagery, it is easy to tell that 92L has not become any better organized over night. The energy is not focusing around the weak low pressure center and continues to be spread out. As long as this continues, the system will not develop.

The pattern we’ve seen in place across the Southeast for the past several days will persist through the weekend with a change finally coming early next week. The front hung up across the area will fade and a return to a more typical summertime pattern will ensue. However, all of the rain that has fallen and that is still coming presents a problem to consider for later on: what if we get a tropical storm or hurricane landfall in this area over the next few weeks? I am concerned about the flood risk for the Southeast should a tropical cyclone pay a visit. So far, there’s not been any risk of that since Alberto back in June. We are coming up on the peak time of the season and there is a lot of talk in the hurricane forecasting world of a busy period coming up as the overall pattern seems to be heading towards one more conducive for development. We’ve seen a lot of rain across a good deal of the Southeast this summer. Rivers will be swollen and the ground saturated. Let’s hope this is not a set-up to a major flood event as we progress through the peak of the season.

In the east Atlantic, Erin remains a weak tropical storm as it fights the dry air still in place. This is not much of a surprise and I think it won’t be too much longer until we see the dry air ease up and the real meat of the season kicks in. In fact, another strong tropical wave is emerging from the coast of Africa now with potential for development over the next several days. At least for now, there are no threats for land areas to worry about.

I’ll post another update this evening concerning 92L and the rest of the tropics.

M. Sudduth 8:57am ET August 17

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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