Quiet time short-lived? Some model support for Gulf development

Substantial MJO pulse forecast by the ECMWF over the next two weeks

Substantial MJO pulse forecast by the ECMWF over the next two weeks

The rest of this week is likely to remain nice and quiet across the Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf but once we get to next week, things could change. Here’s why…

First of all, the time of year supports Gulf of Mexico or western Caribbean development. We shift away from the Cape Verde region and the waters between there and the Lesser Antilles towards a pattern that favors development much closer to land areas. We might be seeing that come to fruition in the coming days.

The other reason I think development could happen is the progression of a strong MJO or Madden-Julian Oscillation pulse. Think of it as a period of fertility in the tropics. Instead of dry, sinking air, the MJO typically brings with it an increase in convection and a general rising motion in the atmosphere. These things are needed to even have a chance for a tropical storm or hurricane to develop.

According to the GFS and the ECWMF, the MJO is about to amplify significantly in to the phases that would, in theory, support development either in the southeast Pacific or the western Caribbean/Gulf of Mexico regions.  Water temps are plenty warm and so now it’s just a matter of watching to see what happens. So far, both the GFS and the ECMWF show signs of developing a tropical storm in the 8 to 10 day time frame. For what it’s worth, the two models are in remarkable agreement on the timing and the general placement of such development – the southern Gulf of Mexico. I usually don’t pay much attention to model forecasts beyond the 5 to 7 day time frame but when the two (rival) models are in agreement, it is worth watching a little closer.

Right now, nothing to worry about at all. It’s important to remember that we are still very much in hurricane season and it’s not over until it’s over. There are signs beginning to come in to focus that we might have one more system to deal with before all is said and done. Obviously I will keep a close eye on how things shake out over the next week or so.

I’ll have more here on this tomorrow.

M. Sudduth 8:35 AM ET Oct 14

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.

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