TS Kate forms but will have little overall impact

Visible satellite picture showing TS Kate in the central Bahamas

Visible satellite picture showing TS Kate in the central Bahamas

The 2015 hurricane season now has its 11th named storm, Kate. The NHC made the upgrade this morning citing 40 mph winds with a pressure of 1008 mb. Kate is moving towards the northwest but will eventually turn out in to the open Atlantic head of an approaching trough.

Right now, the storm is impacting portions of the Bahamas where tropical storm warnings are in effect. However, much of the inclement weather associated with the storm is located to the east of the low level center, leaving much of the Bahamas free of any significant impacts.

Water temps along the track can still support a hurricane but the upper level winds should prevent that from happening. The official NHC forecast calls for some additional strengthening and Kate could reach 50 mph before being absorbed by a larger storm system emerging from the East Coast later this week.

There might be a period of increased swell activity for parts of the Southeast and East coasts which could lead to additional beach erosion issues during times of high tide as the week wears on. Outside of that, I see no reason to worry about Kate along the United States coast.

I’ll post a video discussion covering the latest on Kate this afternoon.

M. Sudduth 8:50 AM ET Nov 9

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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