Field missions 2016: taking you beyond the edge of the envelope via technology

It is now hurricane season for the Atlantic Basin. So far, not much going on which is typical of early June. But what about when things do get busy and we have a landfalling hurricane? Assuming that this in fact happens, let me spell out for you how incredible our field coverage will be in 2016.

The plan

Our plan is to provide complete hurricane coverage from the moment we see a landfall threat until it’s all over and the recovery process begins. We have a dedicated and extremely talented team ready for field work and behind the scenes efforts. When it’s time to go, we will immerse you in the process like you’ve never seen it before. If you have any interest in hurricanes, whether it be from being fascinated by their raw power or maybe you and your family are in harm’s way, we will have it covered.

Everything we do will be streamed live on our public Ustream set of channels. It all begins the moment we leave the driveway and it won’t stop until we get back. We’ve been doing it this way since 2005, before most had any clue of how to stream live from a moving vehicle. It was pretty good then, it’s absolutely incredible now – the technology has come so far, it’s like you’re there with us every step of the way.

This gives us the advantage of keeping you in the loop every second of the mission. When there is new information coming in, we’re on it the moment it breaks. When we know, you’ll know because you’ll be joining us live as if you are there in the Tahoe with us. For those who have seen our coverage, you already know – and it just keeps getting better.

Unmanned cams

One of our 12 unmanned camera systesms - here seen while testing during the blizzard back in January, along the NJ coast

One of our 12 unmanned camera systems – here seen while testing during the blizzard back in January, along the NJ coast

Once we get to the area where we expect landfall, we will begin working to place our unique, state-of-the-art unmanned camera systems in places that no human being should present once the hurricane comes in. We have 12 of these cameras and can literally blanket a region with a virtual fence of live feeds that will leave you breathless when the worst of the weather arrives. Keep in mind that we now have audio with the camera systems, and let me tell you it is stunning how much this improves the experience. We’ve tested the new cams in winter storms and flood events as of late and the audio brings it to a whole new level of virtual immersion in to the worst weather imaginable.

Our goal will be to show the storm surge primarily since that causes the most damage and has the most potential for resulting in loss of life.  Our hope is that by placing an unmanned camera that anyone nearby who refuses to evacuate will think twice considering we believe it to be important enough to stick a camera in their neighborhood. What’s more, we have our own water height markers, surge markers if you will, that we will set up in front of the shot to show you how high the water is at any given moment. This is unprecedented in terms of the value to the public, emergency management, the NWS/NHC and the media. Live cams showing water and storm surge are great – but showing precisely how high the water is at a given location is the next level and can benefit so many people, even in the face of a terrible disaster. Our test in Deweyville, Texas for the record flood back in March proved the worth of this concept.

Screen grab from our Deweyville, TX streaming event that covered the record setting flood from the Sabine river back in March, 2016. Notice the flood marker that we set up on the stop sign to show the rise of water. We will use these same markers during hurricane storm surge events

Screen grab from our Deweyville, TX streaming event that covered the record setting flood from the Sabine river back in March, 2016. Notice the flood marker that we set up on the stop sign to show the rise of water. We will use these same markers during hurricane storm surge events (click on pic to enlarge)

The unmanned cameras typically run for 32 hours which is plenty of time for covering the entire landfall event. This also allows us to set them up in places that would perhaps otherwise be left without any coverage. Small towns or barrier islands that would be it hard by storm surge are now going to have a live camera that, once set up, will provide the people who evacuated with a look at what’s happening. All of this while keeping us out of harm’s way since we won’t be there where the storm surge is. Technology will provide the solution to the problem of how to get incredible live video from the most dangerous part of a hurricane. We will accomplish this goal using our new generation of unmanned cameras.

All of the live feeds will be made available to the public to view at absolutely no cost. We will post links right here on the HurricaneTrack.com homepage and make it very easy to follow along. We encourage viewers to share the links, embed them on their own pages, social media and elsewhere. Since we are using the ad-supported Ustream platform, we have no cost to provide the live feeds. Anyone with a modern device and and Internet connection will able to follow along for as long as they wish. It will be a remarkable experience, I guarantee it.

Weather data

Live weather data will be an important part of our field coverage in 2016

Live weather data will be an important part of our field coverage in 2016

The next step in our field work will be to set up our weather stations to collect the all-important data from the wind and the air pressure. Again, using top of the line equipment, our wind and pressure sensors will provide reliable, accurate data every 60 seconds from the moment we turn it on. This data, along with a web cam image from the site, will feed to our app, Hurricane Impact. It also goes exclusively to our subscribers via an interface we have developed for online viewing of the data. We have two complete weather stations in the U.S. now plus one in Bermuda (I left it there after Gonzalo in 2014). The two stations for U.S. landfalls will run for about 24 hours, providing exceptional weather data no matter how strong the hurricane is. Our goal will be to sample the highest winds with one station, likely placing it within the right-front quadrant relative to forward movement while placing the other station where we believe the eye will pass over, giving us (hopefully) the lowest pressure reading possible. You will be able to watch all of this as it happens – just get our app, it’s a great way to support our work and it gives you something that no one else offers. Sure there is plenty of online weather data, but how many of those stations were set up SPECIFICALLY for that hurricane? Ours are exactly that. Hurricane Impact- two words – search for it on the App Store and in Google Play.

HURRB Weather Balloon

HURRB payload ready for testing in 2015

HURRB payload ready for testing in 2015

All the while our equipment is streaming live video from what could be hell on earth conditions, and our weather stations are sampling the extreme environment, we will be preparing to do something that no one has ever even attempted, much less accomplished.

We call it HURRB for Hurricane Balloon. It’s a cute name for something very important and innovative. We have designed a payload that will be lifted via a 1500 gram weather balloon through the eye of the hurricane just after it makes landfall, to the stratosphere, and back down again via parachute. The payload contains weather sensors to collect temperature, humidity and pressure readings every 6 seconds. Using APRS and Amateur Radio, this data will be sent back live every minute or so. It’s also stored of course on a micro SD card inside the payload. In addition, a high-end GPS device will record the position and speed of the payload, also every 6 seconds, throughout the flight. This will help us to understand the wind pattern in the eye and as high as 100,000 feet above the planet.

Of course, all of this will be recorded via a pair of GoPro cameras placed on the outside of the payload. Never before have we seen the inside of a hurricane’s eye like this – not going vertical. Now imagine the moment when the payload exits the top of the hurricane and soars another 60,000 feet above – looking down on the white, massive spiral bands of the slowly dying hurricane as it moves inland. We don’t know what it will look like but we’re going to find out – if we get a hurricane, or even a tropical storm of decent strength and organization, we’ll launch in 2016.

The weather balloon will reach burst altitude – hopefully around 100,000+ feet – where it will pop and send the payload back to earth via a 4 foot parachute. APRS and satellite tracking will tell us exactly where it is and where it landed. All we have to do is recover it and see what we captured. It could be some of the most incredible video ever seen of a hurricane – we won’t know unless we try.

Colleague Kerry Mallory holding on to the inflated weather balloon and payload right before our test launch last June in Colorado City, Texas

Colleague Kerry Mallory holding on to the inflated weather balloon and payload right before our test launch last June in Colorado City, Texas

We’ve tested HURRB three times since designing it in 2012. The next test is coming up on June 12 in Kansas. After that, we wait for the chance of a lifetime.

Once it’s all said and done, we will have accomplished quite a bit. Basically it’s just a few guys working together to provide what amounts to the most comprehensive hurricane field coverage possible. No TV network will have 12 unmanned cameras placed in the teeth of the hurricane. Other “storm chasers” will certainly have impressive live feeds and hand-held video but they too will have to retreat at some point or risk being hurt or killed. Our cameras have no fear, no wife and kids to come home to, they just sit there and bear witness to the unleashed power that hurricanes bring. We will literally go beyond the edge of the envelope, the danger zone, so to speak, and immerse you in the wind, rain and storm surge like you’ve never witnessed it before. All of it executed via technology.

So there’s our plan. Now we wait and watch for that suspect area of weather that gradually becomes better organized, captivating our every thought as it strengthens and heads towards land. If and when the time comes, we will deliver the best hurricane coverage yet. Come along with us, we’ll take you there.

M. Sudduth 9:30 AM June 1

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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