Mixed signals mean low confidence forecast for TD9

I am going to address TD9 in this blog post and will cover the other activity around the Atlantic and what is going on in the Pacific in my video discussion to be posted early this afternoon. With all of the interest in what happens with TD9 and its potential impact to Florida, I figure I would tackle that first.

Some deep convection has developed with TD9 in the region around wetern Cuba and just south of the island. Whether or not this is the start of a strengthening trend remains to be seen. Click for full size image.

Some deep convection has developed with TD9 in the region around wetern Cuba and just south of the island. Whether or not this is the start of a strengthening trend remains to be seen. Click for full size image.

During the overnight hours, deep thunderstorms began to develop in association with the depression in the vicinity of western Cuba and even to the south of the island. It is not clear just yet if this convection is near the low level circulation center or if perhaps that center has reformed closer to the thunderstorm activity. We will know more as morning visible satellite images come in and recon flies in to the system later today.

For now, the NHC is classifying it as a tropical depression with winds of 35 mph. The forecast is very uncertain due to a variety of mixed signals in the overall pattern for the days ahead.

Normally, a tropical depression over the Gulf of Mexico this time of year would be concerning. While it is somewhat concerning this time around, the limiting factors are fairly substantial.

First of all, strong winds blowing across the top of the depression from north to south are likely keeping the convection removed from the low level center. This is extremely important to the health of the depression and until the shear relaxes, assuming it ever does, we won’t see much strengthening.

Most of the models that do develop the depression in to a tropical storm or a hurricane do so in a couple of days – not in the immediate future. So we have some time to watch and see how the upper level pattern evolves over the eastern Gulf of Mexico. With water temps in the upper 80s in most areas of the Gulf, it won’t take much to allow the system to ramp up quickly.

The other issue is dry mid level air that would need to be mixed out in order for more efficient convection to take place. Dry air is a stable environment and tends to limit the amount of thunderstorms a tropical cyclone can produce. It is not clear whether or not the dry air will remain a limiting factor. Here too, if it abates and the low can generate deep thunderstorms, it’s only a matter of time before it starts intensifying.

Track forecast model plots showing a fairly tight clustering of the models in the Big Bend area of Florida. This could change over the next few days.

Track forecast model plots showing a fairly tight clustering of the models in the Big Bend area of Florida. This could change over the next few days. Click for full size image.

The track forecast is also tricky since we are talking about several days out for one and secondly, Florida’s western coastline is shaped that changes in the course of the would-be storm will have potentially huge impacts on who feels what effects.

For now, the official forecast calls for the center to pass in to the Big Bend area of Florida, in the northeast Gulf of Mexico. This is concerning to me because the region is very prone to storm surge, even from “weak storms”. Obviously a hurricane would be worse but even moderate tropical storm winds can push several feet of water onshore within portions of the Big Bend region.

The next area of concern is Tampa Bay. While most of the model guidance suggests a track farther north, we need to watch this closely since this area is also very susceptible to storm surge from even minor tropical storms.

It appears that it will all come down to the mid level trough that is forecast to come in and erode the strong high pressure area that steered the depression in to the Gulf in the first place. At some point, it will round the western edge of the high and begin turning more north then northeast. When and where this happens will determine what part of Florida receives the most substantial impacts. Obviously the intensity will come in to play at that point as well. It’s still just too soon to know with any degree of confidence – something we have grown accustom to dealing with concerning this system.

For now, I think that the biggest impact will be heavy rain and the possibility of storm surge flooding along the coast. It goes without saying that if the depression becomes a hurricane, those impacts are elevated quite a bit. We’re going to have to wait it out and see what happens with the upper environment over the next few days. The NHC makes it very clear in their forecast that the intensity portion especially is of low confidence. Sometimes that’s just the way it goes.

As I said, I will have a full video discussion posted here by early this afternoon. I will go over the very latest on TD9 plus what to expect as we watch TD8 off the North Carolina coast. Meanwhile, Hawaii is watching TS Madeline and hurricane Lester very closely as both could bring impacts to the region later this week. I will also discuss the coming week to 10 days and what to look for as we head in to September.

M. Sudduth 8:20 AM ET Aug 29

 

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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