Karl getting stronger, will pass close to Bermuda as we watch low latitude system in tropical Atlantic

Recent satellite image showing strengthening tropical storm Karl closing in on Bermuda. The storm should pass just east and south of the island late tonight or early tomorrow morning.

Recent satellite image showing strengthening tropical storm Karl closing in on Bermuda. The storm should pass just east and south of the island late tonight or early tomorrow morning.

Karl is getting stronger and better organized after sputtering for most of its days on the map. Upper level winds are allowing for development and it won’t be too long until Karl becomes a hurricane.

The official forecast keeps the center of Karl just to the south and east of Bermuda very late tonight or early tomorrow morning. It is likely that tropical storm conditions will be felt in Bermuda with isolated hurricane force wind gusts possible in the higher terrain of the island. Winds and seas will begin to subside quickly once Karl tracks farther away over the weekend.

Eventually there will be some increase in the swell activity along portions of the U.S. East Coast and the north-facing beaches of the Caribbean islands. Surfers can expect at least some beneficial wave action in the coming days so be sure to check your favorite surf report site for specific info.

NHC 5 day tropical weather outlook map indicating an area of interest moving across the deep tropics towards the Lesser Antilles next week.

NHC 5 day tropical weather outlook map indicating an area of interest moving across the deep tropics towards the Lesser Antilles next week.

Once Karl clears the pattern we will need to begin watching a tropical wave in the far eastern Atlantic that has potential to develop as it moves west towards the Windward Islands next week. In general, computer models are supportive of development and it is possible that we could see a tropical storm headed for the eastern Caribbean next week. The low latitude track suggests more favorable conditions and certainly very warm sea surface temperatures. Right now the NHC indicates a low chance of development over the next five days. I suspect we will see that begin to increase with time as the energy gathers and moves steadily west over the tropical Atlantic. There’s plenty of time to monitor the situation and see how things evolve. For now, interests in the Lesser Antilles should keep a close eye on this feature and be ready for possible impacts from it next week.

M. Sudduth 7:55 AM ET Sept 23

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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