Irma slightly weaker, impacts to begin in Florida Saturday

This is an article written by Meteorologist Zack Fradella:

As of the 8 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center, Hurricane Irma has weakened slightly now down to a strong Category 4 storm with winds of 150 mph. Movement continues west-northwest at 16 mph.

The track thinking remains the same with a landfall expected on Sunday morning at the southern tip of Florida near the middle to upper keys. Thereafter the storm will move due north up the spine of the state bringing major impacts to almost every city from Miami to Orlando/Tampa to Jacksonville. Those residents in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina will see less impact as long as the storm remains inland although residents in these states are being urged to prepare for a minimal hurricane.

Hurricane watches and warnings have been posted from South Florida up through the Peninsula and expect these to be expanded north throughout the day today.

For those trying to make final preparations, South Florida has all of Friday to do so while the rest of the state has until Saturday afternoon. Conditions will quickly deteriorate from south to north Saturday afternoon and especially Sunday when landfall is expected.

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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