Irma slowly weakening as surge levels rise along coast

From Meteorologist Zack Fradella:

Irma continues to slowly weaken as it moves inland up the west coast of Florida just east of Fort Myers. Winds are now down to 110 mph as the motion remains north at 14 mph.

Residents farther up the west coast of Florida from Sarasota to Tampa will see wind impacts increase through the evening as the eye makes its closest approach to these locations. It should be noted now that the storm is inland and Tampa Bay will not take a direct hit, both wind impacts and surge will not be as high as originally thought. Still, you should take this storm seriously and shelter-in-place tonight.

Inland locations around the Orlando metro will experience an increase in wind as the storm keeps moving north. Expect the worst of the weather to occur during the overnight hours. The tornado risk remains high for all locations north and east of the center of circulation, especially along the Atlantic Coast.

Peak wind gusts recorded so far: 142 mph Naples, 130 mph Marco Island, Cape Coral 101 mph, 88 mph Ft. Myers

Peak tidal surge: 3.9 feet in Naples

It should be noted that Southeast Florida including the metro Miami area has seen the worst of the weather associated with Irma and conditions will continue to improve tonight.

Monitor the latest Naples surge by viewing the Naples Cam below or by downloading the Hurricane Impact app.

Naples Storm Surge Cam

Share

About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply