Nate nearing hurricane strength as it approaches the Gulf

This is an update written by Meteorologist Zack Fradella:

Tropical Storm Nate is now a 65 mph storm with a pressure of 990MB as of the latest 7 p.m. CT advisory from the National Hurricane Center. The movement is very rapid towards the north-northwest at 22 mph.

Nate is now steadily strengthening and those living in the Hurricane Warning area need to rush their preparations to completion.

As the storm approaches the coast of Louisiana on Saturday evening, a turn to the north is expected and depending on exactly where that turn occurs will determine who sees the greatest impacts along the coast. If Nate stays a little more west of track and moves more into Southeast Louisiania the impacts along the coast into the New Orleans area will be greater, comparatively if the system stays more east then the greater impacts will be along the Mississippi/Alabama coasts.

Due to the fast forward motion rainfall totals are not the greatest concern at the coast, it’s the surge. This area along the northern Gulf Coast from Southeast Louisiana to coastal Mississippi and Alabama is prone to storm surge inundation. Projections are for up to 8-10 feet of surge possible and all of these¬†locations are under a Storm Surge Warning.

Farther inland rainfall could cause flash flooding issues from Mississippi and Alabama up through the Appalachians.

Mark is nearing the coast of Mississippi tonight where he will deploy various pods to track the surge inundation as Nate makes landfall Saturday night.

 

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About Mark Sudduth

Greetings! I am Mark Sudduth, the founder and editor of HurricaneTrack.com. The site began in 1999 as a way to post info concerning tropical storms and hurricanes for any interested visitors. Little did I know how big it would become in the years since. Now, we have millions of visitors from all over the world who have come to rely on the site as a no non-sense, tell it like it is resource for all things hurricane related. We are supported by a combination of corporate sponsors and our loyal Client Services members who subscribe to premium content on our sister site, premium.hurricanetrack.com. I am married with six energetic and intelligent children and live in southeast North Carolina. I graduated UNC-Wilmington in 1995 with a BA in Geography and have studied the effects of hurricanes on our society ever since.
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