Harvey moving through the Windward Islands today bound for western Caribbean

TS Harvey track map from the NHC

TS Harvey track map from the NHC

Tropical storm Harvey is moving quickly through the Windward Islands where it has dumped heavy rain, resulting in some flooding in portions of Barbados this morning. The quick motion off to the west will mean that conditions begin to improve by this afternoon across the region as the storm enters the eastern Caribbean Sea.

Once Harvey clears the Windwards today, the next two or three days will be spent watching the evolution of not only its intensity but also its track. Some of the computer guidance suggests that Harvey will become a hurricane and a lot will depend on how close to Central America the storm gets. Obviously the more land interaction there is, the less Harvey will strengthen. Water temps in the western Caribbean are very warm with plenty of fuel for development.

The track forecast is fairly straight-forward essentially taking Harvey generally westward across the Caribbean through the weekend. Towards the end of the five day track the storm is expected to slow down some and gain a little more latitude. How much farther north remains to be seen but it is entirely possible that Harvey will end up over Honduras and move inland from there – never coming back out over water again. We will just have to wait a couple of days to see how the steering pattern plays out over the United States and what changes to the track result.

In the mean time, invest area 92L is holding on for now, probably as a tropical depression but since it is not near land, it really doesn’t matter in my opinion. Strong upper level winds are beginning to impact the system which means it will not have much time to strengthen further and it may just dissipate on its way west-northwest to the north of the Lesser Antilles. There is an outside chance that 92L survives the strong upper winds in a few days and thus could be an issue for the Bahamas or Florida but right now, that seems to be a long shot. We never say never this time of year but as of today, I am not too concerned with the future of 92L.

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NHC begins new era of forecast advisories today

Newly designated "potential tropical cyclone two" and the 5-day track map. What does this mean? Watch the video discussion to learn more.

Newly designated “potential tropical cyclone two” and the 5-day track map. What does this mean? Watch the video discussion to learn more.

It looks as though invest area 92L will go on to become a tropical storm at some point. The shower and thunderstorm activity associated with it has become better organized as today has progressed and as a result, the NHC has begun issuing advisories on it….even though it is not yet a tropical depression or a storm.

This new initiative by the NHC was slated for starting this season though I am sure not many people thought it would be implemented so soon, especially for a tropical wave out in the tropical Atlantic. This is certainly highly unusual to say the least.

I have prepared a special video discussion covering this developing situation which you may view below. I’ll have more coverage here tomorrow, including the latest concerning 93L in the NW Caribbean Sea – which is also forecast to strengthen further and likely become a tropical storm.

M. Sudduth 5:20 PM ET June 18

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92L in the tropical Atlantic bears watching as we wait and see about potential Gulf system

The hurricane season is getting off to a somewhat busy start. While we have not had a new named storm since the beginning of the season, that may be about to change.

Currently, the NHC is monitoring two areas for possible development. One is way out in the deep tropics and has been designated as invest area 92L. The other is a slowly organizing system in the western Caribbean that has potential for further development once it reaches the southern Gulf of Mexico.

I am most interested right now in 92L out in the deep tropics. It has the potential to become a tropical depression and maybe a tropical storm as it approaches the Windward Islands in about 5 days.

The Gulf system is less of a concern at the moment since it is unclear whether or not a low pressure area will ever actually take shape. Could be a large lop-sided area of showers and storms with some tropical storm force winds on the east side, but we’ll just have to wait and see.

I go over all of this and more in my video discussion for today which is posted below.

M. Sudduth 2:30 PM ET June 16

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Tropics busy but nothing set to impact land

Atlantic looking fairly busy considering the strong El Nino season

Atlantic looking fairly busy considering the strong El Nino season

We are closing in on the mid-point of the hurricane season in terms of climatology- September 10th marks the traditional peak of the season. Despite a fairly strong El Nino currently dominating the Pacific, the Atlantic Basin has managed to eek out enough activity to keep the maps active. Today is no exception with several areas to monitor in the coming days.

First, we have TS Grace which is likely to weaken and eventually dissipate somewhere in the Caribbean, if not before. It may bring additional rain to the region but it shouldn’t be too much and hopefully nothing like what Erika brought to Dominica recently.

Grace has little chance of making it to the United States as a tropical cyclone due to the persistent band of strong upper level winds and dry mid-level air situated over the deep tropics.

Next up is invest area 92L which is situated to the east-southeast of Bermuda this morning. The NHC says that it consists of a broad area of low pressure that is supposed to be nearly stationary over the next day or two. Water temps in the region are quite warm and most computer guidance suggests that this will become a tropical depression and perhaps a tropical storm before heading on out in to the far north Atlantic. No worries in Bermuda except for a possible increase in surf as the system organizes.

Elsewhere, a rather innocent looking tropical wave is moving through the southeast Caribbean Sea that could end up in a position where it could fester and try to develop down the road. The global models have been hinting at development somewhere in the western Gulf of Mexico within about a week. In fact, for what it’s worth, the often reliable ECMWF has been rather consistent with this scenario over the past few days. Right now, it’s just something to take note of but nothing more. I think that within 72 hours we’ll have a much clearer idea of what may or may not take shape in the Gulf of Mexico as we get in to next week.

Hurricane Linda satellite photo

Hurricane Linda satellite photo

In the east Pacific, hurricane Linda remains well offshore of Mexico and is expected to weaken as it moves to the northwest with time. However, this morning, it sure seems like it’s on a strengthening trend with a clearer eye showing up in satellite imagery. There is likely to be an increase in the wave action along portions of the Baja as the hurricane moves past but the heavy weather should remain far enough to the west to limit any additional impact. Some high-level moisture may get pulled northeast in to the Desert Southwest later in the week as the hurricane has a large circulation associated with it.

I’ll have a thorough video discussion posted later this afternoon that will take a closer look at all of the happenings in the tropics.

M. Sudduth 8:50 AM ET Sept 8

 

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Weak low pressure moving across Florida worth watching, Edouard stays well out to sea

Invest area 92L moving over southern Florida this afternoon

Invest area 92L moving over southern Florida this afternoon

A weak low pressure area, easy to spot on visible satellite imagery, is crossing south Florida this afternoon. Strong upper level winds have kept it from becoming any better organized by pushing the deep convection away from the low level center.

The low has brought periods of heavy rain to portions of south Florida but so far, nothing widespread has occurred and it looks to remain that way.

Forecasts from various computer models indicate the low will move westward and in to the Gulf of Mexico by tonight. Normally this would be cause for concern since Gulf water temps are in the mid to upper 80s. However, the strong upper level wind pattern is not likely to abate anytime soon. This should keep the low from strengthening too much as it gets pushed across the Gulf towards Texas.

It is obviously worth watching since we’re in the peak of the hurricane season and water temps are so warm. However, without any significant strengthening indicated by the models, I am not too concerned just yet. The low could bring heavy rain to any land areas that it eventually interacts with but beyond that, I see little to be concerned with.

Meanwhile, TS Edouard formed yesterday in the open Atlantic well to the east of the Lesser Antilles. The NHC is forecasting Edouard to turn out in to the Atlantic with a path that takes it northward between 55 and 60 degrees west longitude. This will keep it away from Bermuda. Edouard is forecast to become the season’s fourth hurricane which will help to add to the ACE score which is a numeric method of measuring how active a hurricane season has been. Right now the ACE score is around 20, well below the long term normal of about 100 or so. Edouard should add a few points to the total but it looks like we are going to end up well below the average unless a particularly intense hurricane forms before the end of November.

In the east Pacific, TS Odile continues to move to the west-northwest. It is expected to turn more northwest with time, parallel to the Baja peninsula but well offshore. Higher surf will be felt once again up and down a good deal of the Pacific coast from the Baja up in to southern California – especially once Odile becomes a hurricane. In fact, it is forecast to become a strong hurricane peaking out at 105 mph.

The rest of the east Pacific remains active with disturbances and another depression but none of them pose any threat to land at the moment.

I’ll keep an eye on the low over Florida and will post any updates to Twitter with a full blog post here tomorrow.

M. Sudduth 1:34 PM ET Sept 12

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