Maria now a hurricane and poses a significant threat for catastrophe for Puerto Rico and other islands of the NE Caribbean

12:15 AM ET Monday, September 18, 2018

Sometimes a video is truly needed to express the gravity of a situation. Right now, we are looking at the potential for a terrible disaster to unfold for portions of the islands of the NE Caribbean Sea as hurricane Maria gains strength. If there was ever a time when people need to take something seriously – this is it.

Also, Jose is not nearly the threat that Maria is but the hurricane will bring tropical storm conditions and an array of coastal impacts to a good deal of real estate up and down the East Coast. I take a look at the latest from my hotel in Kitty Hawk, NC in this late night video update:

M. Sudduth

 

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Hurricane Jose a concern for sure but Maria could be an epic disaster for the Lesser Antilles, Puerto Rico

9:45 PM ET Saturday, September 16, 2017

I have posted a video discussion covering the latest concerning Jose which is likely going to miss the East Coast in terms of direct impacts. However, the rip currents and large ocean swells are something to take seriously – check local weather sources for specific info regarding beach conditions and potential hazards.

Maria is an entirely different situation. I am VERY concerned about the well being of people in portions of the Leeward Islands as they continue to struggle day to day in recovery mode in the wake of category five hurricane Irma. The track and intensity for Maria is quite alarming and I address this and more in my evening video post:

M. Sudduth

 

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Speed of movement is apparently an important key for future track of Jose

11:25 pm ET Friday, September 15

I have posted a new video discussion outlining some interesting clues that the latest NHC forecast discussion yielded in tonight’s 11pm ET advisory package.

As you’ll see, the forward speed of Jose is apparently critical in terms of how soon it is able to approach the East Coast of the USA before a small but significant piece of energy dips down to sweep it eastward and away from the coast. Check out the latest video – it’s neat how it all makes sense and is shown within the 18z GFS model:

M. Sudduth

 

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Tropics look to remain very busy as we move through mid-September

9:20 AM ET Thursday, September 14

It is peak time of the hurricane season and we have the activity to prove it, that’s for sure. Right now, we are tracking hurricane Jose which could pose a threat for some impacts to portions of the East Coast over the next few days.

We are also keeping tabs on activity in the east Pacific where hurricane Max is about to make landfall in SW Mexico, bringing with it the risk of heavy rain and related flooding concerns.

In addition, the NHC will begin issuing advisories on a new tropical storm, Norma, to the south of the Baja peninsula.

I cover all of these topics and more in today’s video discussion which is posted below.

M. Sudduth

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Irma, Jose and Katia all part of a very busy peak time of the hurricane season

Updated: 12:15 pm ET Friday Sept 8

It is close to the peak of the hurricane season and the warmer than normal SST profile for the Atlantic Basin is now showing what it can do. We have three powerful hurricanes, all of which will impact land in one way or another. We have not seen a season like this in quite some time – and we have a long way to go yet.

I am in Florida preparing to set out equipment for monitoring the impacts of Irma over the weekend. I plan to put live cameras and two weather stations (wind and air pressure sensors) throughout the southern part of the peninsula. Exactly where I set up the equipment remains to be seen but I have some ideas already.

To follow the live cams and weather data, you will need our iOS app developed for iPhone. It is called Hurricane Impact. It is available on the Apple App Store for $3.99 and the funding helps to support my job in this effort to bring you the best hurricane information and field updates possible.

We also have a subscription service available called HurricaneTrack Insider – see the ad for it on the right column. All of our content is posted there as well exclusively for our members – some have been with us for over 12 years.

I have produced an in-depth video discussion covering Irma, Jose and Katia. Please give it a watch as there is some important information about how to find out what to expect in your LOCAL area. The next update will posted here early this evening from our colleague in New Orleans, meteorologist Zack Fradella.

M. Sudduth

 

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