Live cams up and running along NC Outer Banks to Monitor impacts from Maria

Updated: 1:30 AM ET September 27

Maria is now a tropical storm but do not let the technical term for what the storm is fool you – the impacts are far reaching and are affecting the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Tropical storm conditions, with winds gusting to well over 45 mph in many locations, are still ongoing with off and on rain showers showing up from time to time. Fortunately, this is not a rain event to speak of and as such we won’t have to deal with any heavy rain.

The constant wind, blowing over hundreds of miles of Atlantic water, is literally piling up against the coast, bringing over wash, erosion and storm surge flooding to parts of the Outer Banks. Obviously, it is not widespread nor too destructive but it is creating a big mess for DOT crews to keep up with in terms of keeping roads clear of sand and debris.

For homes immediately adjacent to the Atlantic, the over wash and breaking waves will lead to some damage to fences, landscaping and other loose items that can be easily torn away by sweeping waves – pushed ashore by the constant blast of wind circulating around distant Maria.

It will take another 18-24 hours before we see a marked drop off in the conditions and so this means at least two more high tide cycles to get through before things calm down some. The usual vulnerable locations could see 2 to 4 feet of salt water inundation with standing water remaining for several hours after each high tide. Be VERY careful if driving through this mess – there are numerous boards filled with nails just waiting to puncture your tires. You have been warned…..trust me on this.

I have been working all day and in to the night to place cameras throughout the area. See the list below for Web access to those live cams which are also readily available within our iOS and Android app, Hurricane Impact. If you have the app, check the “live cams” tab for the listing of all the locations. With any luck, the cams will remain online until after dark Weds evening.

Hatteras Village Cam

Avon Cam

Kitty Hawk Cam

Rodanthe Cam

M. Sudduth

 

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Hurricane threat for New England seems to be increasing as we also watch east Atlantic

8:15 AM ET September 15

Jose is a tropical storm right now but is forecast to become a hurricane again over the warm waters of the western Atlantic. In fact, I think there is a decent chance that it becomes a solid category three again before encountering cooler waters north of the Gulf Stream

The official NHC track puts a good chunk of the Northeast just inside the “cone of uncertainty” which means there is now a chance, however small, that Jose directly impacts areas from the NC Outer Banks to points north including Cape Cod.

The key is going to be just how strong and how far west the Atlantic ridge of high pressure is as Jose begins to turn north this weekend. It’s like a balloon inflating – the larger it is the more it expands and pushes Jose westward and closer to the coast.

Right now, the threat from swells is increasing for most of the East Coast, the Bahamas and even portions of the northern Caribbean Islands. This will lead to rough shore break conditions along with dangerous rip currents from time to time. Obviously, this is great news for surfers but for the average swimmer, these conditions can be absolutely life-threatening. It is important to check local surf and beach conditions and be very careful when “enjoying” the swells coming in from Jose.

Meanwhile, we have a new tropical depression, #14, way out in the open tropical Atlantic which is moving generally westward for the time being. It is likely to develop in to TS Lee later today and should eventually turn north in to the open Atlantic.

To the west of the depression, we have invest area 96L which is likely to become tropical storm Maria at some point in time as it cruises west towards the Lesser Antilles. Interests from the Windward Islands up through the areas impacted by Irma and Jose should all be playing close attention to the evolution of 96L over the coming days.

It is simply a busy season – one we have not seen in a long, long time. Records are being set and we’re not talking about the good kind here. It is important with all of the other news and distractions going on around the world and locally that we remain focused on hurricane preparedness. Please look at your sources carefully – if you spot hyperbolic news items being shared on social media, ignore it. People will try to gain likes, favorites and followers by posting old hurricane video, made up B.S. about what may or may not happen with our current systems and so forth. If it sounds outlandish, it almost certainly is – pay no mind. We have enough to deal with already and those who yell loudest are usually the ones who know the least about what is truly going on.

I have posted a new video discussion which goes in to solid detail concerning Jose and the other developing systems in the tropics. Note that this will be the first of two video discussions posted today – I’ll have another one online between 3 and 4pm ET.

M. Sudduth

 

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